I'm a Canadian living in New Zealand. This isn't a weight loss blog anymore. It's more of a healthblr now. So, instead this blog now focuses on busting health myths, feminism, cats, tv shows, body positivity, and everything else I'm interested in.

This is not a thinspo, fitspo, or pro-ed blog. This is a body positive, and sex positive health blog.


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the-exercist:

Why Trying to Burn Calories is a Waste of Your Time:

You can’t burn enough.
There’s no way we can undo the calories we consume with the calories we burn through exercise. There is no way exercise can make up for a bad diet. It’s just not possible. One muffin kills an eternity on the stationary bike. It’s why calorie-burning will never add up in our favor.
Calories aren’t just calories.
Our bodies are much better at processing foods found in nature than foods made in a factory. This is why avocados, bananas, and coconut water are far better for us than fast food, chips and soda — even if the calorie count is the same. It’s not about the calories. So if we’re going to get to healthy and happy, it’s also not about burning the calories.
Ignoring how you feel is a conversation-killer.
Here comes your mind-body connection. If what you practice in your exercise is ignoring how you feel, you kill the conversation with your body. Your body is wonderfully communicative. Your body loves talking to you! And on top of it, your body is extremely smart. But if it’s telling you “Hey this doesn’t feel good, please stop!” and you just keep ignoring that because, after all, exercise is supposed to be miserable — then you lose that conversation. You disconnect from your body, and things don’t get better from here.
So how do we turn it around? How do we get in front of the choices we make, rather than follow them around and try to fix things?
How To Change The Exercise Game
Forget corrective calorie burning as the goal.
Forget “The worse I feel, the better this is for me!” Because we know it doesn’t work. The more we ignore how we feel — the more we practice feeling bad as a good thing — the more we disconnect from our body’s brilliant messaging about what we need to be healthy and happy.
What we practice while we exercise is pretty much how we live all day long. Practice ignoring how we feel, and we lose the chance to feel good. So let’s stop ignoring, and thinking it’s OK to feel crappy when we exercise.

Click Here to read the full article, it’s well worthwhile. 

the-exercist:

Why Trying to Burn Calories is a Waste of Your Time:

  • You can’t burn enough.

There’s no way we can undo the calories we consume with the calories we burn through exercise. There is no way exercise can make up for a bad diet. It’s just not possible. One muffin kills an eternity on the stationary bike. It’s why calorie-burning will never add up in our favor.

  • Calories aren’t just calories.

Our bodies are much better at processing foods found in nature than foods made in a factory. This is why avocados, bananas, and coconut water are far better for us than fast food, chips and soda — even if the calorie count is the same. It’s not about the calories. So if we’re going to get to healthy and happy, it’s also not about burning the calories.

  • Ignoring how you feel is a conversation-killer.

Here comes your mind-body connection. If what you practice in your exercise is ignoring how you feel, you kill the conversation with your body. Your body is wonderfully communicative. Your body loves talking to you! And on top of it, your body is extremely smart. But if it’s telling you “Hey this doesn’t feel good, please stop!” and you just keep ignoring that because, after all, exercise is supposed to be miserable — then you lose that conversation. You disconnect from your body, and things don’t get better from here.

So how do we turn it around? How do we get in front of the choices we make, rather than follow them around and try to fix things?

How To Change The Exercise Game

  • Forget corrective calorie burning as the goal.

Forget “The worse I feel, the better this is for me!” Because we know it doesn’t work. The more we ignore how we feel — the more we practice feeling bad as a good thing — the more we disconnect from our body’s brilliant messaging about what we need to be healthy and happy.

What we practice while we exercise is pretty much how we live all day long. Practice ignoring how we feel, and we lose the chance to feel good. So let’s stop ignoring, and thinking it’s OK to feel crappy when we exercise.

Click Here to read the full article, it’s well worthwhile. 

the-exercist:

How to Buy the Right Running Shoe from Runner’s World:

1) STRING IT OUTYour heel should fit snug, but not tight, says Carl Brandt. “Laced up (but not tied), you should be able to slide your feet out.” Lacing your shoes up through the final eyelet minimizes slippage. There will be some heel movement, but it shouldn’t be uncomfortable. Any irritation you feel in the store, adds Brandt, will be amplified once you hit the road.
2) THE THIRD DIMENSIONA shoe’s upper should feel snug and secure around your instep, explains Brandt. “When people tell me they feel pressure and tightness, they need more space.” If an otherwise great shoe has hot spots or pressure under the laces, try lacing it up a different way (check out Runnersworld.com/lacing for alternative lacing techniques) before moving on to the next shoe.
3) SPREAD OUT A LITTLEYour foot should be able to move side-to-side in the shoe’s forefoot without crossing over the edge of the insole, says James. You should be able to pinch a quarter inch of upper material along the widest part of your foot. If the shoe is too narrow, you’ll feel the base of your little toe sitting on the edge of the shoe last.
4) WIGGLE ROOMFeet swell and lengthen over a run, so make sure there’s a thumb’s width of space between your longest toe (which isn’t always the big toe) and the end of a shoe. A friend or shoe fitter can measure this while you stand with your shoes laced up. Your toes should also wiggle freely up and down, explains Super Jock ‘n Jill running store owner Chet James. “Wiggle room protects against front-of-the-foot issues.”
5) CHECK FOR THE BENDSCheck the flex point before you put on the shoe, suggests Carl Brandt, owner of San Diego’s Movin Shoes running stores. You can do this by holding the heel and pressing the tip of the shoe into the floor. The shoe should bend and crease along the same line your foot flexes. An improperly aligned flex point can lead to arch pain or plantar fasciitis, while a lack of flexibility leads to Achilles-tendon or calf strain.
6) STEP ON ITKnowing your arch type isn’t the whole story. You still need to pinpoint shoes that match your own arch’s contour. You can’t get a good feel by just standing, says James. So take your shoes for a quick jog, either on a store’s treadmill, on the sidewalk, or down a hallway. A natural-feeling support under the arch works for most people, adds James. “Back off the amount of support if you feel your arch cramping.”

To read more Click Here.

the-exercist:

How to Buy the Right Running Shoe from Runner’s World:

1) STRING IT OUT
Your heel should fit snug, but not tight, says Carl Brandt. “Laced up (but not tied), you should be able to slide your feet out.” Lacing your shoes up through the final eyelet minimizes slippage. There will be some heel movement, but it shouldn’t be uncomfortable. Any irritation you feel in the store, adds Brandt, will be amplified once you hit the road.

2) THE THIRD DIMENSION
A shoe’s upper should feel snug and secure around your instep, explains Brandt. “When people tell me they feel pressure and tightness, they need more space.” If an otherwise great shoe has hot spots or pressure under the laces, try lacing it up a different way (check out Runnersworld.com/lacing for alternative lacing techniques) before moving on to the next shoe.

3) SPREAD OUT A LITTLE
Your foot should be able to move side-to-side in the shoe’s forefoot without crossing over the edge of the insole, says James. You should be able to pinch a quarter inch of upper material along the widest part of your foot. If the shoe is too narrow, you’ll feel the base of your little toe sitting on the edge of the shoe last.

4) WIGGLE ROOM
Feet swell and lengthen over a run, so make sure there’s a thumb’s width of space between your longest toe (which isn’t always the big toe) and the end of a shoe. A friend or shoe fitter can measure this while you stand with your shoes laced up. Your toes should also wiggle freely up and down, explains Super Jock ‘n Jill running store owner Chet James. “Wiggle room protects against front-of-the-foot issues.”

5) CHECK FOR THE BENDS
Check the flex point before you put on the shoe, suggests Carl Brandt, owner of San Diego’s Movin Shoes running stores. You can do this by holding the heel and pressing the tip of the shoe into the floor. The shoe should bend and crease along the same line your foot flexes. An improperly aligned flex point can lead to arch pain or plantar fasciitis, while a lack of flexibility leads to Achilles-tendon or calf strain.

6) STEP ON IT
Knowing your arch type isn’t the whole story. You still need to pinpoint shoes that match your own arch’s contour. You can’t get a good feel by just standing, says James. So take your shoes for a quick jog, either on a store’s treadmill, on the sidewalk, or down a hallway. A natural-feeling support under the arch works for most people, adds James. “Back off the amount of support if you feel your arch cramping.”

To read more Click Here.

(Source: the-exercist)

the-exercist:

Walking Lunge

Place a barbell across your shoulders (a), then step your left leg forward into a lunge, bending both knees to 90 degrees (b). Press through your left heel to push up and step forward into a standing position. Step your right leg forward into a lunge and repeat. Each step is one repetition.

the-exercist:

Walking Lunge

Place a barbell across your shoulders (a), then step your left leg forward into a lunge, bending both knees to 90 degrees (b). Press through your left heel to push up and step forward into a standing position. Step your right leg forward into a lunge and repeat. Each step is one repetition.

(Source: womenshealthmag.com)

the-exercist:

"Exactly What to Say to Pay Less For a Gym Membership" from Women’s Health:

Gym memberships can get expensive. Like, steal-the-shampoo-from-the-locker-room-to-break-even expensive.  
Luckily, the guys and gals sitting behind the front desk know that not everyone can afford their prices—and are generally willing to work with members (both potential and existing alike) in order to keep the facilities full and humming along, says Nikki Metzger, owner of BODI gym in Scottsdale, Arizona. 
So, if you want to score a less expensive deal, flag down a manager and drop whichever of these lines apply to you:
"Your gym is totally worth the price!" It might seem a bit backward, but kicking off negotiations by affirming that the asking price is fair is a solid step toward getting a less expensive deal. “Gyms believe—and want you to believe—that their services are worth the rates they are charging,” says Metzger. “Make sure that you don’t come off as devaluing their service.”
"I’m a ______" Are you a student? Teacher? Military service member? Ask if the gym has special rates for cool people like you, she says. Many do, but don’t advertise it.
"I just don’t have that much money.""Explain your current financial situation," suggests Metzger. Nobody wants you to go broke paying for their services, and they might be able to help.
"I’ll sign up for a longer-term contract!" Gyms like sure things. So ask if signing an extended contract will help you get a lower rate, she says. Even if it’s reduced only for the first few months, every little bit helps.

"I’ll work for it." Some smaller studios will let people trade in a few hours of work—swiping fobs at the front desk or wiping down gym equipment, for example—in exchange for services, says Metzger. Also, most gyms offer free memberships to anyone who teaches there. 

the-exercist:

"Exactly What to Say to Pay Less For a Gym Membership" from Women’s Health:

Gym memberships can get expensive. Like, steal-the-shampoo-from-the-locker-room-to-break-even expensive.  

Luckily, the guys and gals sitting behind the front desk know that not everyone can afford their prices—and are generally willing to work with members (both potential and existing alike) in order to keep the facilities full and humming along, says Nikki Metzger, owner of BODI gym in Scottsdale, Arizona. 

So, if you want to score a less expensive deal, flag down a manager and drop whichever of these lines apply to you:

"Your gym is totally worth the price!" It might seem a bit backward, but kicking off negotiations by affirming that the asking price is fair is a solid step toward getting a less expensive deal. “Gyms believe—and want you to believe—that their services are worth the rates they are charging,” says Metzger. “Make sure that you don’t come off as devaluing their service.”

"I’m a ______" Are you a student? Teacher? Military service member? Ask if the gym has special rates for cool people like you, she says. Many do, but don’t advertise it.

"I just don’t have that much money.""Explain your current financial situation," suggests Metzger. Nobody wants you to go broke paying for their services, and they might be able to help.

"I’ll sign up for a longer-term contract!" Gyms like sure things. So ask if signing an extended contract will help you get a lower rate, she says. Even if it’s reduced only for the first few months, every little bit helps.

"I’ll work for it." Some smaller studios will let people trade in a few hours of work—swiping fobs at the front desk or wiping down gym equipment, for example—in exchange for services, says Metzger. Also, most gyms offer free memberships to anyone who teaches there. 

flu0rescented:

friendly reminder that you’re allowed to miss one workout or seven if you feel like it, if you don’t have enough time, if you aren’t feeling alright mentally or physically and you don’t owe anyone an apology. exercise is not an obligation, not a punishment, fuck fitblr quotes plastered on lean bodies that conceal an unhealthy obsession with weight control. full rest days are ok and taking a break and coming back when you’re ready is ok. (✿◠‿◠)

(via sophspiration)

sweat-and-smiles:

long-distance-runnerr:

nezua:

motivation-station123:

bodydiy:

How to tie shoes for running

Wait I need this for my dystonia!!!!

seems like valuable info to pass along

I would have threw out 115$ shoes if I didn’t use the Toe problem one. God bless this post.

I use the heel slipping one and it actually works.

sweat-and-smiles:

long-distance-runnerr:

nezua:

motivation-station123:

bodydiy:

How to tie shoes for running

Wait I need this for my dystonia!!!!

seems like valuable info to pass along

I would have threw out 115$ shoes if I didn’t use the Toe problem one. God bless this post.

I use the heel slipping one and it actually works.

(via mrs-bacon-draper)

the-exercist:

Side Lunge to Curtsy


Holding a dumbbell in your right hand, side lunge to the left, bringing your right hand to your left foot. Lower your booty as much as possible. Keep your toes pointed forward and your left knee bent to no more than 90 degrees.
Push off gently with your left foot, and come into a curtsy position with your left leg crossing behind your left as you press your weight overhead. Keep your hips square and your curtsy tight. Both feet should be pointed forward. This completes one rep.
Repeat by stepping immediately into a side lunge from the curtsy.

the-exercist:

Side Lunge to Curtsy

  • Holding a dumbbell in your right hand, side lunge to the left, bringing your right hand to your left foot. Lower your booty as much as possible. Keep your toes pointed forward and your left knee bent to no more than 90 degrees.
  • Push off gently with your left foot, and come into a curtsy position with your left leg crossing behind your left as you press your weight overhead. Keep your hips square and your curtsy tight. Both feet should be pointed forward. This completes one rep.
  • Repeat by stepping immediately into a side lunge from the curtsy.

(Source: fitsugar.com)

the-exercist:

Spot Reduction is a Myth

"Toning" as You Know it Isn’t Real

There’s No Exercise That Creates “Lean Muscle”:

Eating at Night Doesn’t Cause Weight Gain:

Soreness Doesn’t Mean Progress (“No Pain, No Gain” is a Lie):

No Such Thing as Zero Calorie Foods:

The Sugar in Fruit Won’t Make You Fat:

Body Cleanses are Dangerous and Unnecessary:

Fat is Not Inherently Bad or Unhealthy:

Eating Non-Processed Foods Does Not Automatically Make You Healthy:

symphonyofawesomeness:

Since shin splints can happen when your calf muscles become stronger than the shin muscles, one way to prevent shin splints in the first place is to do some strengthening exercises. Heel walks are beneficial, but here’s a simple move you can do while at your desk.
Sit on a chair that’s tall enough to allow your toes to point without touching the floor.
Place a two- to six-pound dumbbell vertically in between your feet, squeezing the weight gently to keep it in place.
Begin by pointing your toes toward the floor. Then flex your feet and lift your toes as high as you can. This is one repetition.
Complete three sets of 12 reps, stretching your shins with the Reclining Hero in between each set.

symphonyofawesomeness:

Since shin splints can happen when your calf muscles become stronger than the shin muscles, one way to prevent shin splints in the first place is to do some strengthening exercises. Heel walks are beneficial, but here’s a simple move you can do while at your desk.

  • Sit on a chair that’s tall enough to allow your toes to point without touching the floor.
  • Place a two- to six-pound dumbbell vertically in between your feet, squeezing the weight gently to keep it in place.
  • Begin by pointing your toes toward the floor. Then flex your feet and lift your toes as high as you can. This is one repetition.
  • Complete three sets of 12 reps, stretching your shins with the Reclining Hero in between each set.

(via sophspiration)

the-exercist:

Welcome to the Age of the Fitness Snob:

The fitness craze of the past few years has reached a crescendo, ushering in a new type of know-it-all: the exercise snob. This patronizing person works out harder than you do, knows more about fitness than you do, and looks better doing it than you do—or at least that’s how she makes you feel. “Fitness is a part of our culture’s definition of success now, so women want to show each other that they’ve got it figured out,” says Los Angeles sports psychologist Sari Shepphird, Ph.D.
In fact, according to a recentWomen’s Healthsurvey, one in three readers has gotten into an argument about the most effective kind of workout, and 69 percent cop to doling out unsolicited fitness advice to a friend or significant other.
Some fitter-than-thou attitudes can be traced to the recent proliferation of boutique fitness classes and their somewhat cultlike cliques, says Shepphird. The fitness gurus behind these workout trends not only feed into the snobbery but also depend on it to make money. They indoctrinate us with their philosophies, and we quote and retweet them to our friends, taking their words of wisdom as the divine truth. And when you’re drinking the Kool-Aid (or, rather, the coconut water), it can become easy to view your pal who works out on the elliptical at the Y with derision.

Read More Here

the-exercist:

Welcome to the Age of the Fitness Snob:

The fitness craze of the past few years has reached a crescendo, ushering in a new type of know-it-all: the exercise snob. This patronizing person works out harder than you do, knows more about fitness than you do, and looks better doing it than you do—or at least that’s how she makes you feel. “Fitness is a part of our culture’s definition of success now, so women want to show each other that they’ve got it figured out,” says Los Angeles sports psychologist Sari Shepphird, Ph.D.

In fact, according to a recentWomen’s Healthsurvey, one in three readers has gotten into an argument about the most effective kind of workout, and 69 percent cop to doling out unsolicited fitness advice to a friend or significant other.

Some fitter-than-thou attitudes can be traced to the recent proliferation of boutique fitness classes and their somewhat cultlike cliques, says Shepphird. The fitness gurus behind these workout trends not only feed into the snobbery but also depend on it to make money. They indoctrinate us with their philosophies, and we quote and retweet them to our friends, taking their words of wisdom as the divine truth. And when you’re drinking the Kool-Aid (or, rather, the coconut water), it can become easy to view your pal who works out on the elliptical at the Y with derision.

Read More Here

the-exercist:

Bicycles

 Bend your knees in and place your hands behind your head, elbows straight out to the sides (A). Lift shoulders and feet off the floor, and bring one knee in toward your chest while turning your shoulders to bring the opposite elbow to touch the knee (B). Alternate sides, going quickly, but without sacrificing your form—the whole shoulder unit should be turning, not just the arms flapping in and out (C).

the-exercist:

Bicycles

 Bend your knees in and place your hands behind your head, elbows straight out to the sides (A). Lift shoulders and feet off the floor, and bring one knee in toward your chest while turning your shoulders to bring the opposite elbow to touch the knee (B). Alternate sides, going quickly, but without sacrificing your form—the whole shoulder unit should be turning, not just the arms flapping in and out (C).

(Source: womenshealthmag.com)

the-exercist:

Running Mix: 145 BPM (10:30 Mile)
Each song on this running playlist clocks in at 145 beats per minute, helping you stay on track for a 10:30 minute mile. This particular mix is made up of a balance between rock, alternative and pop songs:
 ”(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” by The Rolling Stones
"Use It" by The New Pornographers
"That’s Not My Name" by The Ting Tings
"Rehab" by Amy Winehouse
"Fantasy" by MS MR
"Ooh La La" by Goldtrapp
"My Life Would Suck Without You" by Kelly Clarkson
"Secret Country" by Minus the Bear
"Tell Me Something I Don’t Know" by Selena Gomez
"Here it Goes Again" by OK Go
"Gumboots" by Paul Simon
"The Big Money" by Rush
"My Best Days" by Polar Bear Club
"A Story to Tell Your Friends" by Every Avenue
"Times Like This" by Jet
"This Ladder is Ours" by The Joy Formidable
"Jet Lag" by Simple Plan
"Star Baby" by The Guess Who
"I Don’t Wanna Dance" by Alex Gaudino
Total time = 1 hr 15 min
Click here to visit 8tracks and hear the mix. 

the-exercist:

Running Mix: 145 BPM (10:30 Mile)

Each song on this running playlist clocks in at 145 beats per minute, helping you stay on track for a 10:30 minute mile. This particular mix is made up of a balance between rock, alternative and pop songs:

  •  ”(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” by The Rolling Stones
  • "Use It" by The New Pornographers
  • "That’s Not My Name" by The Ting Tings
  • "Rehab" by Amy Winehouse
  • "Fantasy" by MS MR
  • "Ooh La La" by Goldtrapp
  • "My Life Would Suck Without You" by Kelly Clarkson
  • "Secret Country" by Minus the Bear
  • "Tell Me Something I Don’t Know" by Selena Gomez
  • "Here it Goes Again" by OK Go
  • "Gumboots" by Paul Simon
  • "The Big Money" by Rush
  • "My Best Days" by Polar Bear Club
  • "A Story to Tell Your Friends" by Every Avenue
  • "Times Like This" by Jet
  • "This Ladder is Ours" by The Joy Formidable
  • "Jet Lag" by Simple Plan
  • "Star Baby" by The Guess Who
  • "I Don’t Wanna Dance" by Alex Gaudino

Total time = 1 hr 15 min

Click here to visit 8tracks and hear the mix. 

the-exercist:

Sliding Mountain Climber

Get into push-up position on hands and toes, a disk under each toe. Keeping hips neutral and head in line with spine, slide left knee toward chest (as shown), then back to start. Switch legs to complete one rep. Start slowly at a walking pace, then progress to a run as you improve. 

the-exercist:

Sliding Mountain Climber

Get into push-up position on hands and toes, a disk under each toe. Keeping hips neutral and head in line with spine, slide left knee toward chest (as shown), then back to start. Switch legs to complete one rep. Start slowly at a walking pace, then progress to a run as you improve. 

(Source: self.com)

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